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Mama Africa! How Miriam Makeba Spread Hope with her Song
Exhibition of Illustrated Africana Children's Literature
Monday, January 28, 2019 - Sunday, August 26, 2019
The Auburn Avenue Research Library, in collaboration with the Hammond's House Museum, will host Mama Africa!: How Miriam Makeba Spread Hope with Her Song, a compelling new exhibition featuring the illustrated children’s literature of award-winning artist/illustrator Charly Palmer. These vivid paintings pulsing with color, movement, and emotion creating a driving visual narrative that alight on significant events, in the life of Miriam Makeba, such as her flight from her homeland in disguise, her powerful testimony at the United Nations, the horrific Soweto killings, and Nelson Mandela’s release from jail, ending with the singer’s triumphant return home after apartheid is ended. Miriam Makeba, a Grammy Award-winning South African singer, rose to fame in the hearts of her people at the pinnacle of apartheid―a brutal system of segregation similar to American Jim Crow laws. Mama Africa, as they called her, raised her voice to help combat injustice. Charly Palmer is a graphic designer, illustrator, and fine artist who studied art and design at the American Academy of Art and the School of the Art Institute, both in Chicago. Mama Africa! is his first picture book. This event is free and open to the public at 101 Auburn Avenue NE, Atlanta, GA 30303.
 
Homecoming: The Windows and Mirrors of Black Portraiture
A Historical Photographic Exhibition
Monday, February 24, 2019 - Sunday, May 19, 2019 
In recognition of Black History Month (2019) and its 2019 theme Black Migrations,the Auburn Avenue Research Library (AARL) will host the photographic exhibition Homecoming: The Windows and Mirrors of Black Portraiture, featuring selected images from AARL's archival collection. Homecoming: The Windows and Mirrors of Black Portraiture is a visualized metaphorical extension of the term migration, that emphasizes the use of portrait photography of and by Black people to construct and inhabit new social realities. This exhibition explores Black Portraiture as a transformative tool of self-representation and communal cultural preservation. In addition to mirroring the aesthetic aspirational sentiment within the Black Diasporic experience; these selected portraits also craft a compelling visual window into the radical self-reimaging of Blackness by the descendants of enslaved Africans, liberated from the White Eurocentric gaze. Curated by AARL staff this exhibition is made up of selected images from the African American Family History Association’s (AAFHA) Homecoming: African American Family History in Georgia photographic collection originally curated by Carole Merrit. This collection focuses on images of Black Georgia families from 1750 to the twentieth century. The mission of the AAFHA was "to engage the public in the research and appreciation of the family history of a people whose heritage has generally been unrecognized." This exhibit is free and open to the public at 101 Auburn Avenue NE, Atlanta, GA 30303.
 
Dancing for Hathor: Nubian Women
in Egyptian Cultic Life by Dr. Solange Ashby
Public Lecture
7:00 p.m. Monday, March 25, 2019
In Observance of Women's History Month 2019, the Auburn Avenue Research Library in collaboration with American Research Center In Egypt (ARCE) GA. will host Dr. Solange Ashby who will present Sacred Dancers: Nubian women as Priestesses of Hathor. This public lecture will examine the role of Nubian women in important rites of passage and worship Egyptian cultic life particularly as Priestesses of the Beautiful One, the Gold, the Lady of Dance, the goddess Hathor. Dr. Ashby will also discuss long-standing academic racism of White Egyptologists whose research disparaged and minimized the significance of Nubian women contribution to Egyptian cultic traditions. Dr. Solange Ashby received her Ph.D. in Egyptology, with a specialization in ancient Egyptian language and Nubian religion, from the University of Chicago. She has conducted fieldwork in Egypt, participated in an excavation in El-Kurru, Sudan (royal Kushite cemetery), and holds fellowships at Catholic University’s Institute of Christian Oriental Research and the American Research Center in Egypt. Dr. Ashby teaches Religion at American University in Washington, DC. Her first book, Calling Out to Isis: the Enduring Nubian Presence at Philae, will be released shortly by Gorgias Press. This event is free and open to the public at 101 Auburn Avenue NE, Atlanta, GA 30303.
 
I Am Not Your Negro
Film Screening and Community Dialogue
7:00 p.m. Wednesday, March 27, 2019
The Auburn Avenue Research Library, in collaboration with the Fulton County Remembrance Coalition (FCRC), will host a screening of Raoul Peck’s award-winning documentary, I Am Not Your Negro.FCRC is committed to fostering a lasting dialogue founded on truth and justice, collecting soil at the sites of Fulton County’s 35 documented racial terror lynchings, erecting historical markers, and claiming our monument from the National Memorial for Peace and Justice. Based on James Baldwin's unfinished manuscript, Remember This House, and narrated by actor Samuel L. Jackson, this powerful film explores the history of racism in the United States through Baldwin's reminiscences of civil rights leaders Medgar Evers, Malcolm X, and Martin Luther King Jr., as well as his personal observations of American history. This event is free and open to the public at 101 Auburn Avenue NE, Atlanta, GA 30303.
 
How Journalists and the Public Shape Our Democracy:
From Social Media and "Fake News" to Reporting Just the Facts
Community Discussion
6:30 p.m. Wednesday, March 27, 2019
The Auburn Avenue Research Library, in collaboration with the Georgia Humanities, The Andrew W. Mellon Foundation, and the Atlanta Press Club Inc., will host How Journalists and the Public Shape our Democracy: From Social Media and "Fake News" to Reporting Just the Facts This discussion will be moderated by Shaunya Chavis-Rucker, General Manager and Anchor, Fulton Government TV, and focus on the importance of journalism and a free press in our country, and the role the public plays in an informed democracy. Panelists: Valerie Boyd, Charlayne Hunter-Gault Distinguished Writer in Residence, Grady College of Journalism and Mass Communication, Ernie Suggs, Reporter, The Atlanta Journal-Constitution This program is presented by Georgia Humanities and the Atlanta Press Club through the generous support of the Andrew W. Mellon Foundation. This event is free and open to the public at 101 Auburn Avenue NE, Atlanta, GA 30303.
 
What Doesn't Kill You Makes You Blacker
Author discussion and Book Signing
7:00 Thursday, March 28, 2019
The Auburn Avenue Research Library, in collaboration with Charis Books and More, and the Fulton County Remembrance Coalition, will host Cultural Critic and Author Damon Young as he discusses his memoir, What Doesn't Kill You Makes You Blacker. From one of our most respected cultural observers, What Doesn’t Kill You Makes You Blacker is a hilarious and honest debut that is both a celebration of the idiosyncrasies and distinctions of Blackness and a critique of white supremacy and how we define masculinity. This event is free and open to the public at 101 Auburn Avenue NE, Atlanta GA 30303.
 
Impact of a Narrative: A Conversation About History, 
Trauma, and Restorative Justice
7:00 p.m. Friday, March 29, 2019
The Auburn Avenue Research Library, in collaboration with the Fulton County Remembrance Coalition, will host The Impact of Narrative: Conversation About History, Trauma, & Restorative Justice. In an effort to spark a lasting dialogue that is honest in confronting our history of racial terrorism and constructive in reconciling with this past, this community dialogue / panel discussion will serve as a model of how such conversations can look; and will consist of experts in trauma, restorative justice, history, and activism. Discussion topics will include historical origins, symptoms, interventions, and practical responses to systemic racial injustice. Join us in fostering this dialogue within the community! This event is free and open to the public at 101 Auburn Avenue, Atlanta, GA 30303.
 
Atlanta: Remembrances Beyond the Veil:
The Art of Mary Parks Washington
Exhibit Talk and Lecture
Sunday, March 31, 2019
The Auburn Avenue Research Library (AARL) is proud to present a fine art exhibition, featuring part of the AARL's archived collection of works by Mary Parks Washington, Atlanta: Remembrances Beyond the Veil, The Art of Mary Parks Washington.   Curated by Charmaine Minniefield, Atlanta: Remembrances Beyond the Veil is a historized semiautobiographical exhibition thoughtfully collaged from the personal ephemera, communal memory and artistic vision of Mary Parks Washington. A familial reminiscence of her coming of age in Atlanta, this exhibition is a compelling visual reconstruction of a vanishing Black Mecca, with a profound contemporary relevance that peers deep into what W.E.B. Du Bois coined the “Black World beyond the veil”. The discussion will feature Dr. Alessandro Porco, Assistant Professor of English at the University of North Carolina Wilmington. Dr. Porco primarily teaches courses in poetry and poetic theory, Restoration and 18th-century literature, and cultural studies; and his courses always situate literary production in relation to other artistic practices, including music, cinema, and the visual arts. Dr. Porco's research focuses on hip-hop music and culture, American and Canadian poetry after 1945, and the theory and practice of the avant-garde. He is currently working on a critical edition of the selected poetry of Steve Venright. Mary Parks Washington was born in Atlanta, Georgia on July 20, 1924. Her artistic talent was first recognized by her teachers at Booker T. Washington High School. Washington attended Spelman College where she majored in art and studied under three prominent artist; sculptors Elizabeth Prophet, William Artist, and the painter Hale Woodruff. This exhibition is from the AARL Fine Art Collection and the Mary Parks Washington personal papers, etc. and available for public research.
This event is free and open to the public at 101 Auburn Avenue NE, Atlanta, GA 30303.
 
Practical Equality: Forging Justice in A Divided Nation 
Public Lecture and Book Signing
7:00 p.m. Wednesday, April 10, 2019
The Auburn Avenue Research Library, in partnership with the Southern Center for Human Rights, will host author Robert L. Tsai, professor of law at American University, who will discuss his latest publication, Practical Equality Forging Justice in A Divided Nation. This compelling book on the intersection of law and society is a path-breaking account of how Americans have used innovative legal measures to overcome injustice—and an indispensable guide to pursuing equality in our time. This event is free and open to the public at 101 Auburn Avenue NE, Atlanta, GA 30303.
 
We Want to Do More Than Survive:
Abolitionist Teaching and the Pursuit of Educational Freedom      
Public Lecture and Book Signing 
3:00 p.m.  Saturday, April 13, 2019
The Auburn Avenue Research Library, in collaboration with Charis Books and More, will host award-winning author and Associate Professor of Educational Theory & Practice at the University of Georgia, Dr. Bettina Love, who will discuss her latest publication “We Want to Do More Than Survive: Abolitionist Teaching and the Pursuit of Educational Freedom”. Drawing on her life’s work of teaching and researching in urban schools, Dr. Love persuasively argues that educators must teach students about racial violence, oppression, and how to make sustainable change in their communities through radical civic initiatives and movements. This event is free and open to the public at 101 Auburn Avenue NE, Atlanta, GA 30303.
 
Reentry from Incarceration through
Entrepreneurial Training Services (RITES) Summit
Community Training
10:00 a.m. - 4:00 p.m. Wednesday, April 24, 2019
The Auburn Avenue Research Library, in collaboration with Georgia Micro Enterprise Network, will host the 2019 Reentry from Incarceration through Entrepreneurial Training Services (RITES) Summit. This summit will focus on self-employment as a viable solution for individuals with criminal histories when traditional career opportunities are limited. This event is free and open to the public at 101 Auburn Avenue NE, Atlanta, GA 30303.
 
The Colored Unit Stories of the Segregated
Grady Memorial Hospital School of Nursing, 1920-1966 
Community Discussion 
2:00 p.m. Saturday, May 4, 2019
The Auburn Avenue Research Library will host The Colored Unit: Stories of the Segregated Grady Memorial Hospital School of Nursing, 1920-1966. This community discussion will focus on the racially segregated school of nursing, operated through Grady Memorial Hospital, from 1920 to 1966. Featuring first-hand experiences from members of the National Conclave of Grady Graduate Nurses, this conversation will examine how these African American graduates persevered through systemic racism, and sexism, celebrating their indelible impact on Grady Memorial Hospital and the nursing profession. This event is free and open to the public at 101 Auburn Avenue NE, Atlanta, GA 30303. 
 

 

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