Events Listings

Continue to follow the AARL events page and social media for ongoing programs and exhibitions.

Mama Africa! How Miriam Makeba Spread Hope with her Song
Exhibition of Illustrated Africana Children's Literature
Monday, January 28, 2019 - Sunday, June 30, 2019
The Auburn Avenue Research Library, in collaboration with the Hammond's House Museum, will host Mama Africa!: How Miriam Makeba Spread Hope with Her Song, a compelling new exhibition featuring the illustrated children’s literature of award-winning artist/illustrator Charly Palmer. These vivid paintings pulsing with color, movement, and emotion creating a driving visual narrative that alight on significant events, in the life of Miriam Makeba, such as her flight from her homeland in disguise, her powerful testimony at the United Nations, the horrific Soweto killings, and Nelson Mandela’s release from jail, ending with the singer’s triumphant return home after apartheid is ended. Miriam Makeba, a Grammy Award-winning South African singer, rose to fame in the hearts of her people at the pinnacle of apartheid―a brutal system of segregation similar to American Jim Crow laws. Mama Africa, as they called her, raised her voice to help combat injustice. Charly Palmer is a graphic designer, illustrator, and fine artist who studied art and design at the American Academy of Art and the School of the Art Institute, both in Chicago. Mama Africa! is his first picture book. This event is free and open to the public at 101 Auburn Avenue NE, Atlanta, GA 30303.
 
Homecoming: The Windows and Mirrors of Black Portraiture
A Historical Photographic Exhibition
Monday, February 24, 2019 - Sunday, June 30, 2019 
In recognition of Black History Month (2019) and its 2019 theme Black Migrations, the Auburn Avenue Research Library (AARL) will host the photographic exhibition Homecoming: The Windows and Mirrors of Black Portraiture, featuring selected images from AARL's archival collection. Homecoming: The Windows and Mirrors of Black Portraiture is a visualized metaphorical extension of the term migration, that emphasizes the use of portrait photography of and by Black people to construct and inhabit new social realities. This exhibition explores Black Portraiture as a transformative tool of self-representation and communal cultural preservation. In addition to mirroring the aesthetic aspirational sentiment within the Black Diasporic experience; these selected portraits also craft a compelling visual window into the radical self-reimaging of Blackness by the descendants of enslaved Africans, liberated from the White Eurocentric gaze. Curated by AARL staff this exhibition is made up of selected images from the African American Family History Association’s (AAFHA) Homecoming: African American Family History in Georgia photographic collection originally curated by Carole Merrit. This collection focuses on images of Black Georgia families from 1750 to the twentieth century. The mission of the AAFHA was "to engage the public in the research and appreciation of the family history of a people whose heritage has generally been unrecognized." This exhibit is free and open to the public at 101 Auburn Avenue NE, Atlanta, GA 30303.
 
Sanctuary for the Internal Enemy: An Ancestral Odyssey
Fine Art Exhibition 
Monday, June 10, 2019 - Sunday, September 09, 2019
The Auburn Avenue Research Library is pleased to present Sanctuary for the Internal Enemy: An Ancestral Odyssey, a multimedia solo exhibition in which Tina Maria Dunkley presents prints, assemblages, and textiles based on her publication, The Merikins: Forgotten Freedom Fighters in the War of 1812. This exhibition is an evocative and visually riveting exploration into the lives of enslaved Africans who escaped bondage and fought for the British during the War of 1812. Through meticulous research into her own maternal ancestry, Dunkley learned of the plight of her ancestor, Ezekiel Loney, and other freedom fighters who fled a Virginian plantation in 1814. Loney was among 4,000 former slaves who, after the war, were settled in South Trinidad and called themselves Merikins, a creolization of “American”. Sanctuary for the Internal Enemy: An Ancestral Odyssey was organized by the Wilmer Jennings Gallery of Kenkeleba House and was made possible with support from the Judith Alexander Foundation, the Lubo Fund, and many other generous friends. This event is free and open to the public at 101 Auburn Avenue NE, Atlanta, GA 30303.
 
Course Description and Outline
Summer/Fall 2019
 
July 18 | Google Basics and Drive    
July 25 | Job Readiness   
  
August 1 | Research 101   
August 8 | Digital Literacy    
August 15 | Google Basics and Drive    
August 22 | Job Readiness   
August 29 | Research 101   
 
September 6 | Digital Literacy    
September 13 | Google Basics and Drive 
September 20 | Job Readiness   
September 27 | Research 101   
 
October 4 | Digital Literacy    
October 11 | Google Basics and Drive 
October 18 | Job Readiness   
October 24 | Research 101   
October 31 | Digital Literacy    
 
November 7 | Google Basics and Drive 
November 14 | Job Readiness   
November 21 | Research 101   
 
December 5 | Digital Literacy    
December 12 | Google Basics and Drive
December 19 | Job Readiness   
Classes are open and free to the public. Please R.S.V.P to confirm your attendance. 
 
Google Basics: Maximizing Your Research
Instructional Research Course
7:00 p.m. Thursday, July 18, 2019
The Auburn Avenue Research Library will host Digital Literacy: Understanding Your Online Presence as a part of the progressive instructional series facilitated by AARL's Reference and Research staff. These instructional workshops support the ongoing development of foundational computer literacy and research skills; promoting the library resources and fostering culturally relevant lifelong learning. Digital Literacy is a culturally relevant introduction to computer and information literacy concepts, including critical thinking regarding the construction of information, as well as techniques for accessing and evaluating information. Utilizing the Fulton County Library System collection of resources, with a special focus on those specific to the Auburn Avenue Research Library and relating to the Black experience and Africana studies— this course is influenced by ACRL Framework for Computer Literacy for Higher Education, which outlines threshold concepts for the mastery of information and computer literacy, but geared to meet researchers at any skill level. In recognition of Black Music Heritage month, this Digital Literacy course will be themed around musical history and influences. This course is free and open to the public at 101 Auburn Avenue NE, Atlanta, GA 30303.
 
Black Joy and Resistance: A photo book
Public Lecture / Community Dialogue 
3:00 p.m. Saturday, July 20, 2019
The Auburn Avenue Research Library in collaboration with Hammonds House Museum will host renowned photographer Adreinne Waheed, who will discuss her book of photography Black Joy and Resistance. What can be deemed as a visual representation of Maya Angelou’s, “And Still We Rise,” through her camera lens, Adreinne Waheed’s Black Joy & Resistance, masterfully captures, “The Souls of Black Folks”. Adreinne Waheed is a photographer, photo editor, and archivist based in Brooklyn, NY and Berkeley, CA. She has been making images since age 13. Her work has been published by The New York Times, The Fader, The Crisis, Scholastic, and Time Inc. Books. This event is free and open to the public at 101 Auburn Avenue NE, Atlanta, GA 30303.
 
Sanctuary from the Internal Enemy: Artist Talk with Tina Maria Dunkley
Gallery Talk 
3:00 p.m. Sunday, July 21, 2019
The Auburn Avenue Research Library is pleased to present Sanctuary for the Internal Enemy: An Ancestral Odyssey, a multimedia solo exhibition in which Tina Maria Dunkley presents prints, assemblages, and textiles based on her publication, The Merikins: Forgotten Freedom Fighters in the War of 1812. This exhibition is an evocative and visually riveting exploration into the lives of enslaved Africans who escaped bondage and fought for the British during the War of 1812. Through meticulous research into her own maternal ancestry, Dunkley learned of the plight of her ancestor, Ezekiel Loney, and other freedom fighters who fled a Virginian plantation in 1814. Loney was among 4,000 former slaves who, after the war, were settled in South Trinidad and called themselves Merikins, a creolization of “American”. Sanctuary for the Internal Enemy: An Ancestral Odyssey was organized by the Wilmer Jennings Gallery of Kenkeleba House and was made possible with support from the Judith Alexander Foundation, the Lubo Fund, and many other generous friends. This event is free and open to the public at 101 Auburn Avenue NE, Atlanta, GA 30303.
 
Revisiting the Founding Era: 
What, to the American Slave, is Your 4th of July?
Seeds of Destruction: Episode 3 of Slavery and the Making of America 
Public Screening and Community Dialogue
7:00 p.m. Wednesday, July 24, 2019
As part of the American Library Association’s (ALA), Revisiting the Founding Era project, the Auburn Avenue Research Library will host a screening of Seeds of Destruction: Episode 3 of Slavery and the Making of America. As the North adopted laws to abolish slavery, the South saw its greatest expansion of slavery. The abolitionist movement began to gather strength, contributing to the widening fissure and imminent break-up of the nation. Revisiting the Founding Era is designed to provide librarians and local leaders with the resources and support they need to create engaging community conversations around the Founding Era ideas and themes that influence our lives today. This event is free and open to the public at 101 Auburn Avenue NE, Atlanta, GA 30303.
 
Job Readiness: Maximizing And Properly Conducting a Job Search
Instructional Research Course
7:00 p.m. Thursday, July 25, 2019
The Auburn Avenue Research Library will host Job Readiness: “Return and Get It” maximizing and properly conducting a job search, as a part of the instructional series of classes facilitated by AARL's Reference and Research staff. These instructional workshops support the ongoing development of foundational research skills; promoting the library resources and fostering culturally relevant lifelong learning of professional and employable opportunities within the African American and minority-serving environments. While attending these job fairs, networking events and dropping off a resume is a good start—a deeper engagement is required in today's job market to succeed. We will discuss networking strategies to better enhance employment attainment prospects in African American and minority-serving communities. Utilizing the Fulton County Library System collection of resources, with a special focus on those specific to the Auburn Avenue Research Library and relating to minority-serving institutions and environments— this course is influenced by ACRL Framework for Computer Literacy for Higher Education, which outlines threshold concepts for the mastery of information literacy. This event is free and open to the public at 101 Auburn Avenue NE, Atlanta, GA 30303.
 
Black Mental Health and Wellness: 
Community Dialogue 
3:00 p.m. Sunday, July 28, 2019
In recognition of National Minority Mental Health Awareness Month (July) and in collaboration with the National Alliance On Mental Illness (NAMI) Atlanta/Auburn Affiliate, the Auburn Avenue Research Library will host a Community Dialogue on Black Mental Health and Wellness. This intimate community conversation facilitated by Jade Royal, NAMI Program Board Chair and Kenya Phillips, NAMI Peer Programs Coordinator will focus on how to improve the mental health and wellness of the Black community by providing knowledge and resources about how cultural factors influence the expression and experience of living with a mental illness and the importance of culturally inclusive mental health treatments.. This event is free and open to the public at 101 Auburn Avenue NE, Atlanta, GA 30303.
 
Revisiting the Founding Era: 
What, to the American Slave, is Your 4th of July?
The Challenge of Freedom:
Episode 4 of Slavery and the Making of America 
Public Screening and Community Dialogue 
7:00 p.m. Wednesday, July 31, 2019
As part of the American Library Association’s (ALA), Revisiting the Founding Era project, the Auburn Avenue Research Library will host a screening of The Challenge of Freedom: Episode 4 of Slavery and the Making of America. The complexities of the Civil War and Reconstruction are chronicled through the experience of slave Robert Smalls. The rise of militant groups and new segregation laws show that slavery's eradication had not ended black oppression. Revisiting the Founding Era is designed to provide librarians and local leaders with the resources and support they need to create engaging community conversations around the Founding Era ideas and themes that influence our lives today. This event is free and open to the public at 101 Auburn Avenue NE, Atlanta, GA 30303.
 
Research Studies: Africana Studies
Instructional Research Course
7:00 p.m.Thursday, August 1, 2019
The Auburn Avenue Research Library will host Research 101: Africana Studies as a part of a progressive series of classes facilitated by AARL's Reference and Research staff. These instructional workshops support the ongoing development of foundational information literacy and research skills; promoting library resources and fostering culturally relevant lifelong learning. Research 101 is an accessible, culturally relevant introduction to information literacy concepts, including critical thinking regarding the construction of information, as well as techniques for accessing and evaluating information. Utilizing the Fulton County Library System collection of resource, with a special focus on those specific to the Auburn Avenue Research Library, related to the Black experience and Africana studies, this course is influenced by ACRL Framework for Information Literacy for Higher Education, which outlines threshold concepts for the mastery of information and computer literacy, but geared to meet researchers at any skill level. This event is free and open to the public at 101 Auburn Avenue NE, Atlanta, GA 30303.
 
Death to the N-Word
Film Screening and Community Dialogue
3:00 p.m. Saturday, August 3, 2019
The Auburn Avenue Research Library on African American Culture and History, in collaboration with  Culture Born Studios, will host a screening of the documentary film Death to the N-Word. This event will include a post-screening community dialogue.DTN (Death to The N-Word) is an educational narrative documentary discussing the use of N-Word and the impact it has on the African-American culture and via music. With the consideration that music is a primary foundation of communication, both now and then, it is essential to remove such from the music industry. The intention of this film is not to promote violence; it helps educate all people about the definition of the word, create sensitivity toward the word again, and motivate people to use music for a new empowering resurrection. Seeing the harm that the word is causing within the African-American diaspora prompts readiness to make a change, to create a movement, to put Death to The N-Word. This event is free and open to the public at 101 Auburn Avenue NE, Atlanta, GA 30303.
 
Baldwin at 95: Remembering a Life of Intellect and Activism
Film Screening and Community Dialogue
2:30 p.m. Sunday, August 4, 2019
The Auburn Avenue Research Library, in partnership with the Baton Foundation, Inc., will host a double film screening honoring the life, intellect, and activism of James Baldwin. This program is free and open to the public. James Baldwin: The Price of the Ticket (86 mins.) An emotional portrait, a social critique, and a passionate plea for human equality, James Baldwin: The Price of the Ticket is now considered a classic. Without using narration, the film allows Baldwin to tell his own story–exploring what it means to be born Black, impoverished, gay and gifted – in a world that has yet to understand 
that “all men are brothers.” I Am Not Your Negro (93 mins.) In this documentary, filmmaker Raoul Peck envisions the book James Baldwin never finished. The result is a radical, up-to-the-minute examination of race in America, using Baldwin’s original words and a flood of rich archival material. I Am Not Your Negro is a journey into Black history that connects the past of the modern Civil Rights movement to the present of #BlackLivesMatter. And, ultimately, by confronting the deeper connections between the lives and assassination of these three leaders, Baldwin and Peck have produced a work that challenges the very definition of what America stands for. This event is free and open to the public at 101 Auburn Avenue NE, Atlanta, GA 30303.
 
Digital Literacy: Understanding Your Online Presence
Instructional Research Course
7:00 p.m. Thursday, August 8, 2019
The Auburn Avenue Research Library will host Digital Literacy: Understanding Your Online Presence, as a part of the progressive instructional series facilitated by AARL's Reference and Research staff. These instructional workshops support the ongoing development of foundational computer literacy and research skills; promoting the library resources and fostering culturally relevant lifelong learning. Digital Literacy is a culturally relevant introduction to computer and information literacy concepts, including critical thinking regarding the construction of information, as well as techniques for accessing and evaluating information. Utilizing the Fulton County Library System collection of resources, with a special focus on those specific to the Auburn Avenue Research Library and relating to the Black experience and Africana studies,— this course is influenced by ACRL Framework for Computer Literacy for Higher Education, which outlines threshold concepts for the mastery of information and computer literacy, but geared to meet researchers at any skill level. This course is free and open to the public at 101 Auburn Avenue NE, Atlanta, GA 30303.
 
Cinematic Tribute to the Literary Legacy of James Baldwin
Film Screening and Community Dialogue
1:00 p.m. Sunday, August 10, 2019
The Auburn Avenue Research Library on African American Culture and History, in collaboration with the Counter Narrative Project and the African American Film Critics Association (AAFCA) a cinematic tribute to James Arthur Baldwin (August 2, 1924 – December 1, 1987) This event highlights James Baldwin’s literary works adapted to film: Go Tell It on the Mountain (86 mins.) - 1:00 p.m Adapted from the novel which follows the struggles of an African-American family for three generations, beginning with a young boy trying to please his stern stepfather. If Beale Street Could Talk (120 min.) - 3:00 p.m. A timeless and moving love story of both a couple's unbreakable bond and the African-American family's empowering embrace, as told through the eyes of 19-year-old Tish Rivers. This event is free and open to the public at 101 Auburn Avenue NE, Atlanta, Ga 30303.
 
Keeping Our Kids Out of Jail
Community Dialogue
3:00 p.m. Sunday, August 11, 2019
The Auburn Avenue Research Library in partnership with the Baton Foundation, Inc., and Watchdogs for Justice will host a community conversation about how to keep our children out of jail. This program will examine the ways in which Black youth, Black boys, in particular, are targeted by the criminal legal system and what parents, guardians and those who care for and love them can do to keep them out of jail. Using skits, research and years-long experience as a criminal defense attorney, Clara King will lead an inspiring and informative conversation focused on how to keep our youth out of jail. Among the topics, Ms. King will cover are: what to do when stopped by police, and how one can exercise his or her 4th, 5th, and 6th Amendment Constitutional rights. This event is free and open to the public at 101 Auburn Avenue NE, Atlanta, Ga 30303.
 
The Angola 3: Black Panthers and the Last Slave Plantation
Film Screening and Community Dialogue
7:00 Wednesday, August 21, 2019
In recognition of Black August (2019) the Auburn Avenue Research Library on African American Culture and History will host a screening of the Angola 3: Black Panthers and the Last Slave Plantation. This compelling film tells the gripping story of Robert King Wilkerson, Herman Wallace, and Albert Woodfox, men who have endured solitary confinement longer than any known living prisoner in the United States. This film tells the story of three former members of the Black Panther Party incarcerated at Angola Louisiana State Prison in solitary confinement longer than anyone in modern US history and collectively known as the Angola 3. It focuses on the issues that have surrounded and clouded their cases since the 70s. In addition, our film explores the political climate of the 60s and 70s that produced "political" prisoners in America. By presenting a meticulously researched portrait of these men, their circumstances as well as the context of the times, we want to encourage viewers to think critically about history, racism, the prison system and to actively engage in making changes. This event is free and open to the public at 101 Auburn Avenue NE, Atlanta, GA  30303.
 
Job Readiness: Maximizing and Properly Conducting a Job Search
Instructional Research Course
7:00 p.m. Thursday, August 22, 2019
The Auburn Avenue Research Library will host Job Readiness: “Return and Get It” maximizing and properly conducting a job search, as a part of the instructional series of classes facilitated by AARL's Reference and Research staff. These instructional workshops support the ongoing development of foundational research skills; promoting the library resources and fostering culturally relevant lifelong learning of professional and employable opportunities within the African American and minority-serving environments. While attending these job fairs, networking events and dropping off a resume is a good start—a deeper engagement is required in today's job market to succeed. We will discuss networking strategies to better enhance employment attainment prospects in African American and minority-serving communities. Job Readiness is an accessible, culturally relevant introduction to prepare patrons, and provide essential tools regarding the construction of information and professional development, as well as techniques for accessing and evaluating information. Utilizing the Fulton County Library System collection of resources, with a special focus on those specific to the Auburn Avenue Research Library and relating to minority-serving institutions and environments— this course is influenced by ACRL Framework for Computer Literacy for Higher Education, which outlines threshold concepts for the mastery of information literacy, but geared to meet researchers at any skill level. This course is free and open to the public at 101 Auburn Avenue NE, Atlanta, Ga 30303.
 
Design & Muse
Artist Talk and Panel Discussion
7:00 Friday, August 23, 2019
The Auburn Avenue Research Library, in collaboration with ComfiArt, present Design & Muse, an artist exhibit, pop-up shop, and panel discussion featuring five local Atlanta artists: Maryam Moma, Shalon Wright, Thomas Higgins, Tiffany Sy & Yokiana Daniels. Design and Muse explore the creative process from idea to production. Showcasing five visual artists who used their personal style to create original artwork exclusively for ComfiArt’s product line. Products ranging from t-shirts, socks, coasters, swimwear and more are available for purchase online at www.comfiart.com and in limited quantities in person at Design & Muse on August 23. This installment of Design & Muse will feature a special pop-up exhibition at the Auburn Avenue Research Library in the second-floor gallery from August 12- 25. This event is free and open to the public at 101 Auburn Avenue NE, Atlanta, GA 30303.
 
Google Basics: Maximizing Your Research
Instructional Research Course
3:00 p.m. Sunday, August 25, 2019
The Auburn Avenue Research Library, will host Google Basics and Drive as the progressive instructional series of classes facilitated by AARL's Reference and Research staff. These instructional workshops support the ongoing development of foundational computer and information literacy, and research skills; promoting the library resources and fostering culturally relevant lifelong learning. Google Basics and Drive is an accessible, culturally relevant introduction to Google and its applications, including essential tools regarding the construction of information, as well as techniques for accessing and evaluating information. Utilizing the Fulton County Library System collection of resources, with a special focus on those specific to the Auburn Avenue Research Library and relating to the Black experience and Africana studies— this course is influenced by ACRL Framework for Computer Literacy for Higher Education, which outlines threshold concepts for the mastery of information and computer literacy, but geared to meet researchers at any skill level. This course is free and open to the public at 101 Auburn Avenue NE, Atlanta, Ga 30303.
 
The Family Black and White:
Pro-Slavery Visual Art and the Cult of Justification
Lecture and Community Dialogue
3:00 p.m. Sunday, August 25, 2019
The Auburn Avenue Research Library, in partnership with the Baton Foundation, Inc., will host a lecture about Black imagery in Antebellum art. This presentation will address the ways that supporters of slavery used art to justify their beliefs. Art not only reflected the rhetoric of pro-slavery apologists by representing slavery optimistically but also, it worked to undermine the powerful use of visual culture applied by abolitionists. Illustrating many examples of pro-slavery artworks, Stephens reveals the aggressive backlash of pro-slavery supporters in response to anti-slavery activism and artworks. Rachel Stephens is an Associate Professor of Art History at the University of Alabama. During the spring semester of 2019, she served as a fellow at the Gilder Lehrman Center for the Study of Slavery, Resistance, and Abolition at Yale University. Her first book, Selling Andrew Jackson: Ralph E. W. Earl and the Politics of Portraiture was released in 2018 (University of South Carolina Press). Her talk, The Family Black and White: Pro-Slavery Visual Art and the Cult of Justification, comes from research on her current book project, Hidden in Plain Sight: Slavery and Suppression in Antebellum American Art. This event is free and open to the public at 101 Auburn Avenue NE, Atlanta, Ga 30303.
 
Research 101: Africana Studies
Instructional Research Course
7:00 p.m. Monday, August 29, 2019
The Auburn Avenue Research Library will host Research 101: Africana Studies as a part of a progressive series of classes facilitated by AARL's Reference and Research staff. These instructional workshops support the ongoing development of foundational information literacy and research skills; promoting library resources and fostering culturally relevant lifelong learning. Research 101 is an accessible, culturally relevant introduction to information literacy concepts, including critical thinking regarding the construction of information, as well as techniques for accessing and evaluating information. Utilizing the Fulton County Library System collection of resource, with a special focus on those specific to the Auburn Avenue Research Library, related to the Black experience and Africana studies, this course is influenced by ACRL Framework for Information Literacy for Higher Education, which outlines threshold concepts for the mastery of information and computer literacy, but geared to meet researchers at any skill level. This course is free and open to the public at 101 Auburn Avenue NE, Atlanta, GA 30303.
 
 
 
 
 

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