Events Listings

Continue to follow the AARL events page and social media for ongoing programs and exhibitions.

The Silver Living Legacies Extraordinaire: Women of Distinction
Photographic Gallery Exhibit
September 3, 2019 - February 9, 2020   
Silver Living Legacies Extraordinaire is part of a massive photographic undertaking, highlighting influential Black women of distinction over 60 years of age. Via intimate photographic images, taken by renowned photographer Nafisa Sheriff, this exhibition serves as a reverent visual homage to these powerful Black women and their ongoing legacy. This exhibit will be curated by Arnika Dawkins from the Arnika Dawkins Photographic Fine Art Gallery, Atlanta, GA. This exhibit is free and open to the public at 101 Auburn Avenue NE, Atlanta, GA 30303.
 
The Function of Freedom:
A Visual Tribute to the Life and Legacy of Toni Morrison
Fine Art Gallery Exhibit
November 3, 2019 - February 19, 2020    
The Function of Freedom: A Visual Tribute to the Life and Legacy of Toni Morrison curated by educator and activist Charmaine Minniefield. This exhibit is a communal homage by renowned visual artists to Morrison's iconic stature as a cultural beacon for the enduring power of Black creative authorship and authority.  Charmaine Minniefield draws from indigenous traditions as seen throughout Africa and the Diaspora and her personal connection to women who have played a major role in her life.  Her work explores African and African American rituals from a feminist perspective by pulling the past to the present, conversing between the spirit, space and the physical.  This exhibit is free and open to the public at 101 Auburn Avenue NE, Atlanta, GA 30303.
 
The Roots of Rap: 16 Bars on the 4 Pillars of Hip-Hop   
An Exhibit of Children’s Literature
Thursday, October 16, 2019 – March 1, 2020
The Auburn Avenue Research Library will host The Roots of Rap: 16 Bars on the 4 Pillars of Hip-Hop, a compelling new exhibition featuring the work of award-winning children’s literature artist/illustrator, Frank Morrison. The roots of rap and the history of hip-hop have origins that precede DJ Kool Herc and Grandmaster Flash. Kids will learn about how rap evolved from folktales, spirituals, and poetry, to the showmanship of James Brown, to the culture of graffiti art and break dancing that formed around the art form; and gave birth to the musical artists we know today. Written in lyrical rhythm by award-winning author and poet Carole Boston Weatherford, and complete with flowing, vibrant illustrations by Frank Morrison, this book beautifully illustrates how hip-hop is a language spoken the whole world 'round. Also featured is a foreword by Swizz Beatz, a Grammy Award-winning American hip-hop rapper, DJ, and record producer. This event is free and open to the public at 101 Auburn Avenue NE, Atlanta, GA 30303.
 
Exploring Intersectionality and Otherness
Film Screening and Community Discussion Series
6:00 p.m. Every Wednesday in January 2020
AARL’s Community Dialogue and Discussions are every Wednesday at 6 pm and are free and open to the general public. During these events, the Library will screen a film or documentary followed by a discussion. Throughout the month of January, the AARL will screen iconic film features, exploring specific intersections of the Black Experience. Each week, colorful conversations and dialogues dedicated to LGBTQ+ issues, Religious and Racial Censorship in African American Muslim Women, and Sexuality will be explored. Each feature film is followed by a discussion portion. Come into the library, an experience awaits you! 
 
Archives Opening Event
Atlanta Chapter of the Gospel Music Workshop of America (GMWA)
3:00 p.m. Sunday, January 19, 2020
Celebrating 44 years of service, the Atlanta Chapter of the Gospel Music Workshop of America launches its collection with the Auburn Avenue African American Research Library. Gospel Music Workshop of America founded by the late Rev. James Cleveland in Detroit, Michigan in 1968, the Gospel Music Workshop of America, a not-for-profit, interdenominational, interracial, international, and voluntary association of gospel choirs, choruses, ensembles, quartets, soloists, instrumentalists, and musicals joined together for the continuing education, cooperation, and communication of ideas for the advancement of gospel music, as an African-American Sacred Music genre. The Atlanta Chapter was incorporated as a non-profit organization, October 9, 1980, in the City of Atlanta, Georgia to develop and promote excellence in the preparation, execution, and the study of the church (gospel) music and worship in the State of Georgia. This collection will highlight the many contributions over the years. This event is free and open to the public at 101 Auburn Avenue NE, Atlanta, GA 30303.
 
A Good Day to Be Black and Sexy
Film Screening and Community Discussion
6:00 p.m. Wednesday, January 22, 2020
As part of the weekly Community Dialogue and Discussion, the Auburn Avenue Research Library will highlight iconic cinematic features, highlighting Intersectionality and Otherness, with a screening of the film, A Good Day to Be Black and Sexy. In this collection of six vignettes, designed to shatter stereotypes about black sexuality, writer/director/editor Dennis Dortch explores the subject of sexuality and relationships within the black community. From the woman determined to get hers first, to the curious teenager who finds herself in a questionable situation, and the boy who becomes stifled by interracial taboos, Dortch's film doesn't shy away from the more controversial aspects of contemporary sexuality. This event is free and open to the public at 101 Auburn Avenue NE, Atlanta, GA 30303.
 
Job Readiness: “Return and Get It” Maximizing and Properly Conducting a Job Search
Instructional Research Course
7:00 p.m. Thursday, January 23, 2020
The Auburn Avenue Research Library (AARL) will host Job Readiness: “Return and Get It” Maximizing and Properly Conducting a Job Search, as a part of the instructional series of classes facilitated by AARL's Reference and Research staff. These instructional workshops support the ongoing development of foundational research skills; promoting the library resources and fostering culturally-relevant lifelong learning of professional and employable opportunities within the African American and minority-serving environments. While attending job fairs, networking events and dropping off a resume is a good start, a deeper engagement is required in today's job market to succeed. Staff will discuss networking strategies to better enhance employment attainment prospects in African American and minority-serving communities. Job Readiness is an accessible, culturally relevant introduction to prepare patrons, and provide essential tools regarding the construction of information and professional development, as well as techniques for accessing and evaluating information. Utilizing the Fulton County Library System's collection of resources, with a special focus on those specific to the AARL, and relating to minority-serving institutions and environments, this course is influenced by Association of College & Research Libraries (ACRL) framework for Computer Literacy for Higher Education, which outlines threshold concepts for the mastery of information literacy, but geared to meet researchers at any skill level. This course is free and open to the public at 101 Auburn Avenue NE, Atlanta, GA 30303.
 
Interwoven
Film Screening and Community Discussion
6:00 p.m. Wednesday, January 29, 2020
As part of the weekly Community Dialogue and Discussion, the Auburn Avenue Research Library will highlight iconic cinematic features, highlighting Intersectionality and Otherness, with a screening of the film, Interwoven. Starring Academy Award winner Mo'Nique, Interwoven is a drama interweaving thirteen true-life stories to create one compelling tale of the fragile ties which connect us all. In the film, many of the talented ensemble cast members portray their own personal stories and share their experiences with homelessness, suicide, death, and addiction. This film explores those moments, big and small, in which strangers impact another person's life in ways they couldn't possibly imagine, all in an effort to answer that elusive question, "What is it all about?” This event is free and open to the public at 101 Auburn Avenue NE, Atlanta, GA 30303.
 
Research 101: Africana Studies
Instructional Research Course
7:00 p.m. Thursday, January 30, 2020
The Auburn Avenue Research Library (AARL) will host Research 101: Africana Studies as a part of a progressive series of classes facilitated by AARL's Reference and Research staff. These instructional workshops support the ongoing development of foundational information literacy and research skills; promoting library resources and fostering culturally-relevant lifelong learning. Research 101 is an accessible, culturally relevant introduction to information literacy concepts, including critical thinking regarding the construction of information, as well as techniques for accessing and evaluating information. Utilizing the Fulton County Library System's collection of resources, with a special focus on those specific to the AARL, and relating to the Black experience and Africana studies, this course is influenced by Association of College & Research Libraries (ACRL) Framework for Information Literacy for Higher Education, which outlines threshold concepts for the mastery of information and computer literacy, but geared to meet researchers at any skill level. This course is free and open to the public at 101 Auburn Avenue NE, Atlanta, GA 30303.
 
African Americans and the Vote
Film Screening and Discussion Series
The year 2020 marks the centennial of the Nineteenth Amendment and the culmination of the women’s suffrage movement. The year 2020 also marks the sesquicentennial of the Fifteenth Amendment (1870) and the right of Black men to the ballot after the Civil War. In observance of these historic events, the AARL will screen films and documentaries, exploring the history of the Fifteenth Amendment, voter suppression and purging, and the right of Blacks to the ballot after the Civil War. In celebration of Black History Month and in observance of the historic events mentioned, the AARL will screen intriguing films or documentaries, exploring the history of the Fifteenth Amendment, voter suppression. Each screening is followed by a discussion portion. The month’s theme has a rich and long history, which begins at the turn of the nineteenth century— in the era of the Early Republic, with the states’ passage of laws that democratized the vote for white men while disenfranchising free blacks. All documentaries and films are rated PG-13 and minors should be accompanied by a mature guardian or parental unit. Come into the library! An experience awaits you! This event is free and open to the public at 101 Auburn Avenue NE, Atlanta, GA 30303.
 
A Garden for Black Boys: Between the Stages of Soil and Stardust
Poetry Reading and Community Discussion
3:00 p.m. Saturday, February 1, 2020
The Auburn Avenue Research Library will host artist and poet W.J. Lofton, for a conversation on her published collection of poetry, A Garden for Black Boys: Between the Stages of Soil and Stardust. A Garden for Black Boys invites the reader into a world where tough questions are unpacked and answers are presented raw, extremely intimate, and containing a breath of their own. Each poem applauds the humanity of black people that is often overlooked in America. Inspired by tragedy, the continual shootings of unarmed black men and women, the author labors out a rallying cry that not only wreaks of grief but determined hope; a possibility to see a better tomorrow. Make no mistake, A Garden for Black Boys is as much a riot song as it is a hymn calling for healing. W.J. Lofton is an artist, poet, and activist residing in Atlanta, Georgia. A Garden for Black Boys is his sophomore collection, continuing his campaign on healing and equity for black people. He is also the author of These Flowers Were Held by Broken Vases, published in 2016. Lofton is a Chicago native and hopes to leave a legacy centered on activism and art. This event is free and open to the public at 101 Auburn Avenue NE, Atlanta, GA 30303.
 
Richard Wright: Black Boy
Film Screening and Community Discussion
3:00 p.m. Sunday, February 2, 2020
The Auburn Avenue Research Library, in collaboration with the Baton Foundation, Inc., will host a film screening about the life and work of author Richard Wright. Richard Wright: Black Boy is the first documentary film on the life, work, and legacy of Richard Wright. Born outside Natchez, Mississippi in 1908, Wright overcame a childhood of poverty and oppression to become one of America’s most influential writers. His first major works, Native Son and Black Boy were runaway best sellers which are still mainstays of high school and college literature and composition classes. The film skillfully intercuts dramatic excerpts from Wright’s own work, with historical footage and the recollections of friends, associates, and scholars such as Ralph Ellison, Margaret Walker, and Wright’s daughter Julia, who trace Wright’s later development as a writer back to the brutality and racism of his Southern childhood. This event is free and open to the public at 101 auburn Avenue NE, Atlanta, GA 30303.
 
Black Is... Black Ain't.
Film Screening and Community Discussion
6:30 Monday, February 3, 2020
The Auburn Avenue Library in collaboration with the Counter narrative Project will screen the documentary, Black Is…Black Ain’t. The final film by filmmaker Marlon Riggs, Black Is...Black Ain't, jumps into the middle of explosive debates over Black identity. White Americans have always stereotyped African Americans. But the rigid definitions of "Blackness" that African Americans impose on each other, Riggs claims, have also been devastating. Is there an essential Black identity? Is there a litmus test defining the real Black man and true Black woman? While Black Is...Black Ain't, rejoices in Black diversity, many speakers bare their pain at having been silenced or excluded because they were perceived as "not Black enough" or conversely "too Black." The film marshals a powerful critique of sexism, patriarchy, homophobia, colorism and cultural nationalism in the Black family, church and other Black institutions. This event is free and open to the public at 101 Auburn Avenue NE, Atlanta, GA 30303.
 
CHISHOLM '72 Unbought & Unbossed
Film Screening and Community Discussion
6:00 p.m. Wednesday, February 5, 2020
The year 2020 marks the centennial of the Nineteenth Amendment and the culmination of the women’s suffrage movement. The year 2020 also marks the sesquicentennial of the Fifteenth Amendment (1870) and the right of black men to the ballot after the Civil War. In observance of these historical events, the AARL will screen films and documentaries, exploring the history of the Fifteenth Amendment, voter suppression and purging, and the right of blacks to the ballot after the Civil War. CHISHOLM '72 Unbought & Unbossed is the first historical documentary on Brooklyn Congresswoman Shirley Chisholm and her campaign to become the Democratic Party's presidential nominee in 1972. The documentary follows Chisholm from the announcement of her candidacy in January to the Democratic National Convention in Miami, Florida in July. Chisholm's fight for inclusion, as she writes in her book The Good Fight (1973), encompasses all Americans who agree that the institutions of this country belong to all of the people who inhabit it. Shunned by the political establishment, Congresswoman Shirley Chisholm asks people of color, feminists and young voters for their support to reshape our society and take control of our destiny as we go down the Chisholm Trail in 1972.  This event is free and open to the public at 101 Auburn Avenue NE, Atlanta, GA 30303.
 
Research 101: Africana Studies
Instructional Research course
7:00 p.m. Thursday, February 6, 2020
The Auburn Avenue Research Library (AARL) will host Research 101: Africana Studies as a part of a progressive series of classes facilitated by AARL's Reference and Research staff. These instructional
workshops support the ongoing development of foundational information literacy and research skills; promoting library resources and fostering culturally-relevant lifelong learning. Research 101 is an accessible, culturally relevant introduction to information literacy concepts, including critical thinking regarding the construction of information, as well as techniques for accessing and evaluating information. Utilizing the Fulton County Library System's collection of resources, with a special focus on those specific to the AARL, and relating to the Black experience and Africana studies, this course is influenced by Association of College & Research Libraries (ACRL) Framework for Information Literacy for Higher Education, which outlines threshold concepts for the mastery of information and computer literacy, but geared to meet researchers at any skill level.  This course is free and open to the public at 101 Auburn Avenue NE, Atlanta, GA 30303.
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

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